Hun School Students Examine Immigration Laws with Danish Peers

The Hun School of Princeton’s Global Studies and History elective: Global Problems selects one of twenty global problems, as identified by the National Association of Independent Schools, to study each year. The class is currently paired with students in Denmark to design alternative regulations to international labor and immigration laws. On Thursday, December 4th, to provide a personal context for this discussion, Pauline McKean, director of global and immersion programs, invited three young immigrants to visit her Global Problems class to share their experiences as undocumented college students in America.
The Hun School of Princeton’s Global Studies and History elective: Global Problems selects one of twenty global problems, as identified by the National Association of Independent Schools, to study each year. The class is currently paired with students in Denmark to design alternative regulations to international labor and immigration laws. On Thursday, December 4th, to provide a personal context for this discussion, Pauline McKean, director of global and immersion programs, invited three young immigrants to visit her Global Problems class to share their experiences as undocumented college students in America.

Valeria Posso, Mayra Sanchez, and Edwin Benavides entered the country as children, after fleeing social and political situations in their native countries – Colombia, Mexico, and Honduras respectively. Each is seeking education and an opportunity for a better life in America.

Mr. Benavides explained, “One thing that we all share – all your parents share and my parents share – is a purpose. All your parents want you to succeed. My parents want me to succeed. Your parents were lucky that they were born here. My parents didn’t have that luck.”

Ms. McKean’s students discussed current events surrounding American immigration law and the social construct of geo-political boarders.

“This is a complicated topic,” said Scott Hanks ’15 “economics, politics, education, jobs, health, safety, and culture are all wrapped up in immigration policy.”

Jessica Johnson ’16 said, “America has always been characterized as a diverse land of opportunity and freedom. As we discuss immigration laws, it is important for us to keep in mind that what illegal immigrants want are the same things that we are afforded.”
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    • Edwin Benavides visited The Hun School of Princeton’s Global Problems class to discuss attending college in America as an undocumented immigrant. Mr. Benavides is a participant of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, giving him reprieve from deportation.

The Hun School of Princeton is an independent, coeducational, private day and boarding college preparatory school.  Student-centered, hands-on learning prepares students for the global community in which they will live and work.

176 Edgerstoune Road, Princeton, NJ 08540  |  Phone: (609) 921-7600 | Email: admiss@hunschool.org